Category Archives: News

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You Will Never Text And Drive After This …We Promise!

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Never in my life have I felt chills down my spine just by watching an ad. This is so powerful, it’s crazy. Even more so when you realize that this is something that occurs on a daily basis. People should be smarter than this.

What would you say in a situation like this? How would you feel? Apologies mean nothing at this point, just an overwhelming burden that you’re about to take someone’s life. You’ll never text and drive after this, I promise. It will change you.

If you know anyone who does, share this, this could be them.

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New Laws For those addicted to Texting!

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Love this new blog I found today!

I agree that we should enforce the following laws Roger White from OldSpuse.com recommended

  • WWT: Walking While Texting
  • WMWT: Watching a Movie While Texting
  • IYPWT: Ignoring Your Parents While Texting
  • CWRLPWT: Conversing With a Real Live Person While Texting  <—this one should come with a mandatory sentence of 4 years

Check out Roger’s write up on Texting While driving here!

We need more people in the world like you my friend!

 

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Distracted while Driving!

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Just stumbled across a wonderful post written by http://brianwriting.wordpress.com/

He had me with the first paragraph when he referred to my favorite TV show of all time “The Wire” referencing Omar’s philosophy on how everyone should have a code.

That Policeman story taking a life and getting off is Bull*hit!  Be sure to check the Business Insider link on his blog HERE

WATCH THE ROAD – Work or not!  Pay Attention!

texting and driving

Who are teens texting While driving?

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Up to half of teens talking on cellphones while driving are speaking with their mother or father, according to new research.

“A lot of parents aren’t really aware of how important it is to be a good role model and how dangerous it is for their teen to answer a cellphone while driving,” said study author Noelle LaVoie, a cognitive psychologist and president of Parallel Consulting in Petaluma, Calif.

“There is certainly [prior research] showing that parents might not be modeling the best behavior for teens,” she added, “and we know a lot of parents talk on the phone while driving. But this was a real shock.”

The findings are scheduled to be presented Friday at the American Psychological Association’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Research presented at scientific conferences typically has not been published or peer-reviewed and is considered preliminary.

About 2,700 teens aged 16 to 19 are killed each year and another 280,000 are treated and released from emergency departments after motor vehicle crashes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Distracted driving causes 11 percent of fatal crashes among teens, and 21 percent of those crashes involve cellphones, according to a 2013 report by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. And, another recent study found that as many as 86 percent of 11th and 12th graders admit to using their cellphones while driving.

Teens have previously reported seeing their parents and others use their cellphones while driving, which makes it seem as if it’s the social norm, according to the study authors.

To get a better idea of what parents’ roles were in teen cellphone use while driving, LaVoie and her colleagues designed a survey based on in-person interviews with 13 teens aged 15 to 17 who had either learner’s permits or driver’s licenses. Every teen who acknowledged talking on the phone while driving said they talked to parents, while 20 percent said they talked to friends.

The researchers then interviewed or surveyed about 400 drivers aged 15 to 18 in 31 states. Teens with learner’s permits were the least likely to talk and drive — 43 percent of them didn’t use a phone. When 16- to 17-year-olds were given an unrestricted license, just 29 percent chose not to use their phone while driving. By 18, that number dropped to only 10 percent who didn’t talk and drive, according to the study.

Among these participants, more than one-third of the 15- to 17-year-olds and half of the 18-year-olds said they talked on the phone with a parent while driving, the survey found.

Teens were slightly more cautious about texting and driving. Almost two-thirds of teens with learner’s permits didn’t text while driving. By the time teens were 18 with an unrestricted license, that number dropped to just over one-quarter.

Teens were more likely to text friends than parents while driving. But, 16 percent of 18-year-old drivers had texted a parent while behind the wheel and 8 percent of 15- to 17-year-olds had done the same, according to the researchers.

Teens told the researchers that their parents expect to be able to reach them, and that they may get mad if they can’t contact the teens.

“This is a very critical reminder of the importance parents play in making sure their teens are safe drivers,” said Jonathan Adkins, executive director of the Governors Highway Safety Association in Washington, D.C., who wasn’t involved in the research.

“The message here has to be to parents to stop driving distracted themselves and to set ground rules for teens that they should not be using the phone while driving,” he added. “Teens follow what their parents do, not what they say.”

While widespread public awareness campaigns surrounding the dangers of texting and driving have successfully lowered the incidence of that form of distracted driving, LaVoie said, the same type of campaigns need to be utilized for cellphone conversations while driving.

Parents and teens should also discuss these dangers, she said, and set strategies for minimizing them. These might include parents asking their teens if they’re driving when they call, and if so, either telling them to call them back later or pull over so they can talk.

“The biggest [strategy] is through education with parents,” Adkins said. “They have to change the culture so it’s no longer acceptable for anyone to use their cellphone and drive. This is a wake-up call for good parenting.”

 

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Stop Text Stop Wrecks

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Fact # 1

Five seconds is the average time your eyes are off the road while texting. When traveling at 55mph, that’s enough time to cover the length of a football field. (2009, VTTI)

Fact # 2

Reaching for a phone, dialing, texting and other uses of portable devices increased the risk of getting into a crash by three times. (2009, VTTI)

Fact # 3

11% of all drivers under 20 involved in fatal crashes were reported as distracted. This age group has the largest proportion of drivers who were distracted. (2012, NHTSA)

Get your free Watch The Road App here.  Its for Droid users, IPhone IOS coming soon.

Click Link below to be direct to the Google play store what you will see more screen shots, photos and features

GOOGLE PLAY STORE

GET YOURS NOW BY CLICKING HERE  

AMAZON

CLICK HERE

Make sure you follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WatchTheRoadApp

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This Pretty Much Sums it up!

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Here’s something 98% of the people here in Cali need that drive instead of Public transportation.  I can’t tell you how many countless idiots I seen on the road texting up a mountain at 80 mph.  I see at least 2 to 3 accidents a day in my long commute to and from the office.  Give it up people!  its not worth it!

Get your free Watch The Road App here.  Its for Droid users, IPhone IOS coming soon.

Click Photo below to be direct to the Google play store what you will see more screen shots, photos and features

GOOGLE PLAY STORE

GET YOURS NOW BY CLICKING HERE  

AMAZON

CLICK HERE

Make sure you follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WatchTheRoadApp

– See more at: http://sosickwithit.com/2014/07/31/watch-road-app/#sthash.6rHNIEHR.dpuf

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Wisconsin’s only texting-while-driving simulator

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Everything is fun and games and “LOL” until a car, a bike, a ball or — worse — a little kid unexpectedly stops in front of you.

That’s when the simulator stops, and the driver more or less “fails.”

The Wausau Police Department brought the state’s only texting-while-driving simulator to a health fair last Saturday, July 26, at Bryan and Stratton College. The result was myriad teachable moments.

“I generally think the students who are using it are surprised because most people feel confident that they’re not taking their eyes off the road for that long of time,” said Lt. Nathan Pekarske of the Wausau Police Department. “They feel confident, like ‘I do this all the time; it’s not a big deal.’ They don’t realize how quickly, with your eyes off the road, someone can step in front of you and how quickly a traffic accident can unfold.”

The texting while driving simulator is a computer system comprised of sensors and other equipment that hook up to a normal car that is lifted on pedestals, so it cannot move. The driver wears virtual reality glasses and operates the vehicle as bicycles, pedestrians and cars cross his or her path.

The simulator moderator then prompts the driver to pull out their cellphone and begin texting or scrolling through different apps.

“The general outcome is, most people, once they start texting, they will end up missing a stop light, hitting a pedestrian, and at that time the simulation stops,” Pekarske said.

The Wausau Police Department aims this teaching device at new drivers in high school or college-age drivers.

“They are the age group most likely to be active in sending text messages or doing things on their phone compared to other populations of people,” Pekarske said. “Also, they are the newest people on the road.”

According to TextingAndDrivingSafety.com, 55 percent of young adult drivers claim it’s easy to text while they drive. However, teens who text while driving spend about 10 percent of their driving time outside of their lane, the report said.

Text messaging also makes a crash up to 23 percent more likely, according to the website.

Texting while driving is illegal in Wisconsin. Using a cellphone while driving is also illegal for any driver with a probationary license or instruction permit, except to report an emergency, according to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation.

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Jenny McCarthy’s Son Called the Cops on Her for Texting While Driving

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Jenny McCarthy, who has never been a contender for World’s Best Parent, recently took to her new Sirius XM talk show and told a humorous lil’ anecdote about how her son called the cops on her for texting while driving with him in the vehicle.

She shared the following tale about her 12-year-old son, who she termed a “rule follower”: “We’re driving in the car and of course I text and drive,” she said on the radio program. “He called the police on me and said, ‘My mom is texting and driving right now.’ True story.” She responded, quoth Jenny, by throwing his phone out the window.

Parenting pro-tip: some rules are meant to be followed, such as the rule that says don’t use your hands and eyes to engage in written communication while driving a moving vehicle — especially not with your child in said moving vehicle. Also, like, if there are several PSA campaigns warning you not to engage in a behavior because you could die, maybe don’t do it with your kid around? I DON’T KNOW. Just spit-balling here.

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Family Begs Drivers After Fatal Crash

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The family of a 50-year-old man who was killed when he was rear-ended on Interstate 80 Friday afternoon said they are angered and distraught by the accident that took the beloved grandfather’s life.
“I’m so upset, so angry that someone could be an adult and be so careless,” said Lanisha Blockmon, daughter of Walter Blockmon.

Walter Blockmon was killed in a four-vehicle crash near south suburban Hazel Crest. Police said a Toyota SUV rear-ended Blockmon’s Dodge car, causing a chain-reaction collision that shut down eastbound lanes of I-80 for roughly three hours.
Blockmon was pronounced dead at Advocate South Suburban Hospital in Hazel Crest, according to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s office.
The drivers of the Toyota and a Hyundai involved in the crash were taken to hospitals with non-life threatening injuries.

The driver and a passenger in a fourth vehicle were not hurt, police said.
“This is so surreal, this is so hard,” said Blockmon’s mother Georgia Blockmon. “It is so hurting. No one believes that this happened.”
Family members said police told them the driver who caused the crash may have been texting or looking at their GPS.
“They took away somebody and we won’t be able to see him anymore cause of a simple text,” Lanisha Blockmon said.
No tickets had been issued and no charges were filed Saturday as the investigation is ongoing, police said.

I will miss my dad calling me every day,” Lanisha Blockmon said. “I’ll miss him being with his grandchildren. He won’t be able to see them grow up, go to prom or college. He’ll miss all of that.”
Family members said they have a message for drivers:
“Please, please no texting and driving,” Lanisha Blockmon said. “Whatever is going on can wait.”
Lanisha Blockmon said she may never be able fill the hole the tragedy has left in her family.
“Make sure that you tell your family that you love them every day before you leave because you don’t know if you will be able to see that that evening,” she said.

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Driving while Texting Six Times More Dangerous than Driving while Drunk

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Driving a vehicle while texting is six times more dangerous than driving while intoxicated according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).1 The federal agency reports that sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent — when traveling at 55 mph — of driving the length of an entire football field while blindfolded.2
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Texting in cars and trucks causes over 3,000 deaths and 330,000 injuries per year, according to a Harvard Center for Risk Analysis study.3

Texting while driving a vehicle has now replaced drinking while driving as the leading cause of accidents and deaths of teenage drivers.4 Texting in traffic isn’t simply a problem among teens and 47% of adults admit that they text while driving.5 Texting drivers are 23 times more likely to be involved in a crash than non-texting drivers.6

State Texting Banned while Driving7
Alabama Yes
Alaska Yes
Arizona No
Arkansas Yes
California Yes
Colorado Yes
Connecticut Yes
Delaware Yes
D.C. Yes
Florida No
Georgia Yes
Hawaii No
Idaho Yes
Illinois Yes
Indiana Yes
Iowa Yes
Kansas Yes
Kentucky Yes
Louisiana Yes
Maine Yes
Maryland Yes
Massachusetts Yes
Michigan Yes
Minnesota Yes
Mississippi No 8
Missouri No 9
Montana No
Nebraska Yes
Nevada Yes
New Hampshire Yes
New Jersey Yes
New Mexico No 10
New York Yes
North Carolina Yes
North Dakota Yes
Ohio Yes
Oklahoma No 11
Oregon Yes
Pennsylvania Yes
Rhode Island Yes
South Carolina No
South Dakota No
Tennessee Yes
Texas No 12
Utah Yes
Vermont Yes
Virginia Yes 13
Washington Yes
West Virginia Yes
Wisconsin Yes
Wyoming Yes

 
The proportion of alcohol-related traffic crash deaths has dropped 52% since 1982, and are now at historic lows, but the proportion of traffic accident fatalities that are NOT alcohol-related has jumped 78% during the same time.14 Although there are still far too many, we’re winning the war against alcohol-related traffic deaths. But texting-related traffic fatalities are epidemic and we’ve barely begun to fight the problem. Indeed, it appears that people are barely aware of it.

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) could be of enormous help in the struggle, but has not only shown no interest but has repeatedly resisted any discussion of this major cause of traffic crashes, injuries and deaths.

Fortunately, there’s also good news. A survey conducted by NHTSA found that 90% of drivers support laws to ban texting while driving.15 A survey reported by Nationwide Insurance found that 80% of drivers support some type of cell phone usage restrictions. The majority of respondents say they are supportive of laws restricting any type of cell phone use while driving; 80% support a ban on text messaging while driving; 80% support a ban on e-mailing while driving; and almost 75% believe that restrictions should apply to all drivers, not just specific groups such as teens.16

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Distracted Driving Laws

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June 2014
This chart outlines state distracted driving laws. Some localities have additional regulations. Enforcement type is shown in parenthesis.

Hand-held Cell Phone Use: 12 states, D.C., Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands prohibit all drivers from using hand-held cell phones while driving. Beginning in October 2013, all laws will be primary enforcement—an officer may cite a driver for using a hand-held cell phone without any other traffic offense taking place.
Learn More About Distracted Driving

Issue Brief

Distracted Driving Publications

State Media Campaigns

Tips to Avoid Distractions

Related Links

All Cell Phone Use: No state bans all cell phone use for all drivers, but 37 states and D.C. ban all cell phone use bynovice drivers, and 20 states and D.C. prohibit it forschool bus drivers.
Text Messaging: Washington was the first state to pass a texting ban in 2007. Currently, 43 states, D.C., Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands ban text messaging for all drivers. All but 5 have primary enforcement. Of the 7 states without an all driver texting ban:
4 prohibit text messaging by novice drivers.
3 restrict school bus drivers from texting.

Crash Data Collection: Nearly all states include at least one category for distraction on police crash report forms, although the specific data collected varies. The Model Minimum Uniform Crash Criteria (MMUCC) guideline provides best practices on distraction data collection.

Preemption Laws: Many localities have passed their own distracted driving bans. However, some states – such as Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Oklahoma – prohibit localities from enacting such laws.

State Hand-held Ban All Cell Phone Ban Text Messaging Ban Crash
Data
School Bus Drivers Novice Drivers All
Drivers
School Bus Drivers Novice Drivers
Alabama 16, or 17 w/ Intermediate License <6 months
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Alaska Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Arizona Yes
(Primary)
Yes
Arkansas 1 18 – 20 years old (Primary) Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Secondary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
California Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Secondary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Colorado <18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Connecticut Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban
Delaware Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Learner or Intermediate License (Primary) Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
D.C. Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Learners Permit
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Florida Yes
(Secondary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Georgia Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Guam Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban
Hawaii Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Idaho Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Illinois Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
<19
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Indiana <18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Iowa Restricted or Intermediate License
(Primary)
Yes
(Secondary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Kansas Learner or Intermediate License
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Kentucky Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Louisiana Learner or Intermediate License
(regardless of age)
Yes
(Primary)
1st year of License
(Primary for <18)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Maine <18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Maryland Yes
(Primary)
<18 w/ Learner or Provisional License
(Secondary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Massachusetts Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Michigan Yes
(Primary)
Level 1 or 2 License
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Minnesota Yes
(Primary)
<18 w/ Learner or Provisional License
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Mississippi Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Learner or Provisional License
(Primary)
Yes
Missouri <21
(Primary)
Yes
Montana Yes
Nebraska <18 w/ Learner or Intermediate License
(Secondary)
Yes
(Secondary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Nevada Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
New Hampshire 2 Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban
New Jersey Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Permit or Provisional License
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
New Mexico In State vehicles Learner or Provisional License
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
(eff. 7/2014)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
New York Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
North Carolina Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
North Dakota <18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Ohio <18
(Primary)
Yes
(Secondary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Oklahoma Learner or Intermediate License
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Learner or Intermediate License
(Primary)
Yes
Oregon Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Pennsylvania Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Puerto Rico Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban
Rhode Island Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
South Carolina Yes
South Dakota Learner or Intermediate License
(Secondary)
Yes
(Secondary)
(eff. 7/2014)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Tennessee Yes
(Primary)
Learner or Intermediate License
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Texas 3 Yes, w/ passenger<17
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes, w/ passenger<17
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
Utah Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Vermont In work zones <18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Virgin Islands Yes
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Virginia Yes
(Primary)
<18
(Secondary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Washington Yes
(Primary)
Learner or Intermediate Licence
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
West Virginia Yes
(Primary)
<18 w/ Learner or Intermediate Licence
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Wisconsin Learner or Intermediate Licence
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Wyoming <18
(Primary)
Yes
(Primary)
Covered under all driver ban Yes
Total States 12 + D.C. PR, Guam, Virgin Islands
All Primary
20 + D.C.
All Primary
37 + D.C.
Primary (31 + D.C.)
Secondary (6)
43 + D.C., PR, Guam, Virgin Islands
Primary (38 + D.C., PR, Guam, Virgin Islands)
Secondary (5)
3
All Primary
4
All Primary
48 + D.C., Virgin Islands

 

1 Arkansas also bans the use of hand-held cell phones while driving in a school zone or in a highway construction zone. This law is secondarily enforced.
2 Dealt with as a distracted driving issue; New Hampshire enacted a comprehensive distracted driving law.
3 Texas has banned the use of hand-held phones and texting in school zones.

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Get Your Free Watch The Road App

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GET YOUR FREE FROM GOOGLE PLAY  <–CLICK HERE TO GET IT
Looking for a simple app to keep you, family and friends focused on the road? Well look no further – Watch The Road app is all you need!The addiction to texting, emailing, Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter, Instagram and more is real! Even myself as an adult knows the difficulty in maintaining the self control and discipline to just simply Watch The Road.I wanted to keep this simple and easy, just a quick download and the push of a button and the app is activated. What is really nice about this, is once deactivated, your phone resumes to its normal settings. You will also be able to see who called and all the incoming text messages from when the Watch The road app was activated.Part of the issue when I drive, and a client either calls or text. I felt the need to reach out to them to at least say “hey I’m driving at the moment, and I will contact you once I get off the road”. But its not worth it, so much can happen in that quick period. Accidents, tickets and the possibility of a loss of life is just not worth it.Watch the Road app will allow you to preset your message before driving, once activated, callers and texters will automatically receive your pre-generated message before activating, notifying them that you are currently driving. Once you have reached your destination, simply deactivate and retrieve all incoming messages with the satisfaction of knowing your family, friends, clients or bill collectors know you were being a safe road worthy, remarkable person.

Get your app now, and its completely free. Spread the word. I do thank you for taking the time to check out the Watch the Road app. Please email me at admin@sickfingers.com if you have any questions, concerns or request.

Have a wonderful day

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Texting and Driving Statistics

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Texting while driving is a growing trend, and a national epidemic, quickly becoming one of the country’s top killers. Drivers assume they can handle texting while driving and remain safe, but the numbers don’t lie.

Texting While Driving Causes:

1. 1,600,000 accidents per year – National Safety Council
2. 330,000 injuries per year – Harvard Center for Risk Analysis Study
3. 11 teen deaths EVERY DAY – Ins. Institute for Hwy Safety Fatality Facts
4. Nearly 25% of ALL car accidents

Texting While Driving Is:

1. About 6 times more likely to cause an accident than driving intoxicated
2. The same as driving after 4 beers – National Hwy Transportation Safety Admin.
3. The number one driving distraction reported by teen drivers

Texting While Driving:

1. Makes you 23X more likely to crash – National Hwy Transportation Safety Admin.
2. Is the same as driving blind for 5 seconds at a time – VA. Tech Transportation Institute
3. Takes place by 800,000 drivers at any given time across the country
4. Slows your brake reaction speed by 18% – HumanFactors & Ergonomics Society
5. Leads to a 400% increase with eyes off the road

More Great Info can Be found here http://www.textinganddrivingsafety.com/texting-and-driving-stats/

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Dangers of Texting and Driving

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According to the Institute for Highway Safety, texting while driving causes 1.6 million accidents a year causing 330 thousand injuries and 11 teen deaths every day.

As parents, friends, role models, we must start by setting a good example with the kids. If we are on our phones and texting and driving, you can be sure the kids will do the same when they are behind the wheel. We also need to tell our kids that not only are they not to text and drive but if they are in a car with someone texting and driving that they are to inform someone and not ride with that person again. Get the Watch the Road app TODAY!

While technology is a wonderful thing, sadly it has its negative consequences. But as with seat belt awareness back in the 80s, through education and enforcement, we can combat what is sadly becoming a epidemic in the United States.